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The introduction of SMART Motorways has hade a significant effect on both traffic and drivers alike. Our new course is specifically aligned to meet the needs of all road users on SMART Motorways.

DQC:

Reminder to trainers:

Training time cannot be counted as:
ID and licence checks
Registration
Eyesight checks
Comfort breaks
Lunch breaks
Exams
Formal tests.

SMART Motorways:

The introduction of SMART Motorways has hade a significant effect on both traffic and drivers alike. Our new course is specifically aligned to meet the needs of all road users on SMART Motorways.

Highways England is responsible for smart motorways in England and uses technology to actively manage the flow of traffic.

The technology is controlled from a regional traffic control centre which monitors traffic and activate signs and speed limits to keep the traffic flowing freely.

Motorway Incident Detection Automated Signalling (MIDAS) is used to monitor and control traffic speeds

Information Panels are sited in line with specifications on SMART Motorways, these: -

  • Provide road users with on road information
  • Able to provide text and picture information
  • Fixed to lightweight gantries

There are standard dynamic traffic management signs consisting of overhead gantry’s displaying Advanced Motorway Indicators (AMIs) which are displayed.

 SMART Motorways are serviced by a series of Emergency Refuge Areas (ERAs) which are: -

  1. Standard lay-by design but tapers reversed.
  2. Same legal status as Hard Shoulder.
  3. Essential safety measure applied when exiting into live lane.
  4. Emergency telephone sited.

Ministers consult on new offences for cyclists
The Department for Transport (DfT) has outlined plans to create new offences for cyclists equivalent to causing death or serious injury by careless or dangerous driving, and floated the idea of introducing a law against drivers passing too closely.

Traffic Commissioner:

Poor maintenance isn't acceptable from operators.

Those who don't look after their vehicles properly put the safety of other road users at risk.

If an operator can't get the basics right, they shouldn't expect to be allowed to run extra vehicles.

A skip operator who appeared before the Traffic Commissioner, Richard Turfitt, recently found this out.

The firm applied to go from two to six vehicles. But, when DVSA visited, the examiner found no recorded brake testing, safety inspections stretched to 36 weeks, ineffective driver defect reporting and a 100% test failure rate at annual test.

Vehicles from a limited company were also being used on a sole trader licence.

Would you let this business run an extra four vehicles? 

At public inquiry, the operator admitted he was:

  • not up to date with the 2018 edition of the roadworthiness guide
  • unaware of recent changes in test standards
  • hadn't undertaken any formal refresher training as a TM

The Traffic Commissioner said this had led to a situation where the licence holder was ignorant of the requirements. With better knowledge he might have avoided an S marked prohibition on a vehicle that was also found to be out of test.

Mr Turfitt turned down the fleet increase and made an order to revoke the limited company and sole trader licences.